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Never Let Me Go 

by Kazuo Ishiguro

As children, Kathy, Ruth, Tommy, and all the students of Hailsham are taught that they are special children, that they have a purpose, and that above all they must keep themselves healthy. However, the true nature of their horrifying life's purpose is eventually revealed and they must deal with the psychological trauma of facing their fate one by one. 

Though disturbing to read, this novel is refreshing in its own way because it follows the lives of characters who do not necessarily fight the corrupt system that they are born into. This causes the readers to consider how acceptance and desensitization play a role in a society that is so much bigger than the power of one individual. Through such a pessimistic point of view, Ishiguro actually inspires the reader to not give in to corruption and to appreciate the beauty of life. 

This book is different. It isn't fun to read at all, but in a way it feels necessary. Frustrating and depressing, it forces the reader to consider the value of life and the twisted side of humanity that will do anything to live as long as possible. In addition, it deals with love, jealousy, fear, and regret. 

Juila, 18

Rating: 

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Fang: A Maximum Ride novel 

by James Patterson
09/06/2012 Categories: action adventure genetic engineering siblings

Fang coverIn book 6 of the Maximum Ride series, Max and the flock face their biggest challenge yet as Angel, on a CMS mission to Chad, predicts that Fang will be the first to die. Max becomes worried about this prediction especially since she and Fang had just finally started hitting it off. Tensions rise in the group itself as Fang and Max become a couple and the rest of the flock feels left out. They feel especially in danger when they're attacked and neither Max nor Fang are there to save them. And to add more to Max's list of troubles, she now has to deal with another crazy evil scientist, Dr G-H, who wants to use the bird kids as test subjects. What makes this time worse is that Dr. G-H has created a bird kid of his own, Dylan, and Max finds him to be perfect...is it possible that he's to replace Fang?

I truly did like the idea behind Fang. The story, and the entire series as well, is one that keeps you hooked and interested. There are quite a few twists and turns and you'll always find yourself on the edge of your seat and the balls of your feet as Patterson throws surprise after surprise at you with every new page. The only thing that was a bit troublesome was the writing style. It was a bit too childish at times and seemed to wander from the topic at hand at some parts.

I would recommend this book to all others, especially those of you who love a great adventure. Fang gets you thinking about the possibilities with human genetics, but also brings up the ethical and moral responsibilities behind it all. 

Jana, 17

Rating: 

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Bunker 10 

by J.A. Henderson

Bunker 10 coverIn Bunker 10, several children living in a military outpost are left alone with nothing but their wits to figure out what happened. When a team of heavily armed killers arrives at the base things go from bad to all out warfare.

I liked this book because it is exciting and suspenseful. People who would like this book would be people who enjoy sci fi novels or video games.

Liam, 15

Rating: 

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Vesper 

by Jeff Sampson

Vesper coverEmily Webb doesn't fit in anywhere. She doesn't talk much, is best friends with the most sarcastic girl in school, wears sweatshirts every day, and watches movies as her daily diet. Suddenly, strange things begin to happen to her: starting with the night her classmate, Emily Cooke, is murdered. That same night, she is hit by a spur-of-the-moment urge to sneak out her window, only to look down and realize just a few moments before, her personality turned into someone (or something) completely different. Confused and scared, Emily realizes that there's something different about her that separates her from possibly humanity itself, and that someone is out to get her. 

I would give this a 3.5 if I could, mainly because although the plot was confusing, I couldn't put this book down and immediately scoured through the sequel afterwards. Firstly, the thing that bugged me the most was how exactly Emily came to the conclusion that she was (SPOILER ALERT) a werewolf. Maybe I missed something, but I genuinely thought she had some sort of Jekyll and Hyde syndrome until she, well, sprouted fur. Despite my confusion, however, there is something about this book that wouldn't let me put it down. Maybe it was the plot action, or the interesting book setup. 

This 'drive' to gallop through the book is what I think has made a lot of books (such as Twilight and The Hunger Games) famous. I think that this itself warrants at least a peek at the first couple of chapters, so werewolf-lovers, make sure to pick up a copy the next time you stop by at the library!

Erica, 16

Rating: 

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Havoc 

by Jeff Sampson

Havoc coverEmily Webb, human-werewolf hybrid, is back in action: this time along with Spencer and some new cohorts--and enemies. As she uncovers more of her mysterious past, and how she and the others became werewolves in the first place, Emily realizes how dangerous the path the teens tread can be.

The best part of the book was, in my opinion, the addition of more Deviants. Dalton, who recently recovered from his head injury, is back in the game and excited to test out his new abilities. However, what pained me the most was the escapades the group shared, such as breaking into a secret lab and whatnot without much difficulty. I felt like the events portrayed in the book were unrealistic as a whole, yet somehow the naivety of the Deviants were fitting--after all, they're only teenagers.

Again, with the massive cliffhanger at the end of the sequel, I am eagerly anticipating the third installment of Vesper. If you like werewolves (or simply teens who can kick butt), check out this book the next time you drop by at the library!

Erica, 16

Rating: 

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