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How To Catch A Prince 

by Rachel Hauck

How to Catch a Prince is story about Stephen, the prince of Brighton, who doubles as a war veteran and a rugby player. As the media dubs him the most eligible bachelor in Brighton and attempts to set him up, Stephen recalls the one girl he'd like to be with, and the reasons why he cannot.

I liked How to Catch a Prince because it was not the typical romance story. With subplots about war and survivor's guilt, How to Catch a Prince kept me engaged in the story.

I would recommend this book to fans of Dee Henderson's O'Malley series. Fans of war, politics, and romance all in one would enjoy this book.

Amanda, 16

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To Kill a Mockingbird 

by Harper Lee
03/26/2014 Categories: classic court battles deep south racism rape

To Kill a MockinbirdThat one famous line "It's a sin to kill a mockingbird" has captivated millions of readers. In this book, it's the innocent versus the guilty and the notion that the guilty prevails over the innocent in some cases. A black man is accused of raping a white woman while really, he is innocent. But with the times being what they are, he has no chance of being tried at a fair trial. Narrated by a young girl who experiences all of life's twists and turns, this book will keep you turning pages until the last word is read.

It was a really good book that made me really think about how life worked. It captivated me with its world of innocent vs. guilty and wrong vs. right.

I would recommend this book to everybody. It is one of those books that make you really think about the unfairness of life while touching your heart at the same time.

Hieu, 14

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To Kill a Mockingbird 

by Harper Lee

To Kill a MockingbirdThe book is about the Finch family taking on a court case. Supposedly a black man raped a white woman and it caused a big stir because some people believed he was innocent.

I liked it because it was in a way fighting racism. Back in the 30's a white man's word was always right over a black man's word but Atticus did not care and still took on the case.

I would recommend it to others who like sort of old timely books. I would also recommend it to people who like books on fighting racism.

Sabrina, 14

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To Kill a Mockingbird 

by Harper Lee

To Kill a MockingbirdTo Kill a Mockingbird is set during the Great Depression and also revolves around racism in the South. Scout Finch is the narrator and the main character who grows up in the segregated South. Her brother, Jem, their friend, Dill, and she are all intrigued by story of Boo Radley, a young man who has been prisoner in his house for multiple years. When their father, a lawyer, takes on a court case defending a black man accused of raping a white woman, their world changes.  

The book follows their lives and proves the theme that you can't judge a person unless you have been in their shoes. I thought the book was interesting in the way of how segregated the community was. It was a good story with an underlying theme and multiple conflicts. Overall, Harper Lee did a fantastic job of portraying the South.

I would recommend it because it has a good message of not judging a person until you have experienced what they have been through. People of all ages would enjoy this novel.

Chanel, 14

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To Kill A Mockingbird 

by Harper Lee

To Kill a MOckingbirdTo Kill a Mockingbird is about fictional character named Scout narrating from an adult perspective about something that happened during her childhood. Her story has two main plots: one about she, her brother, and their friend trying to learn more about Boo Radley, a man who has nasty rumors made about him and never leaves his home; and another about the court case in which an African American man named Tom Robinson is convicted for accused rape.

I thought the book was okay overall, because I enjoyed the suspense of the court case, but some other elements of the story seemed bland, or just were not relatable to me in my generation. For example, the scenes with Scout in school did not interest me much, for it had too much detail of a simple elementary school classroom.

I would recommend this book to adults who were around when it was written, since it would relate more to their generation. Also I would relate it to anyone who enjoys exciting court cases, since the court scenes are gripping and exciting.

Hayley, 15

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