by Kazuo Ishiguro

As children, Kathy, Ruth, Tommy, and all the students of Hailsham are taught that they are special children, that they have a purpose, and that above all they must keep themselves healthy. However, the true nature of their horrifying life's purpose is eventually revealed and they must deal with the psychological trauma of facing their fate one by one. 

Though disturbing to read, this novel is refreshing in its own way because it follows the lives of characters who do not necessarily fight the corrupt system that they are born into. This causes the readers to consider how acceptance and desensitization play a role in a society that is so much bigger than the power of one individual. Through such a pessimistic point of view, Ishiguro actually inspires the reader to not give in to corruption and to appreciate the beauty of life. 

This book is different. It isn't fun to read at all, but in a way it feels necessary. Frustrating and depressing, it forces the reader to consider the value of life and the twisted side of humanity that will do anything to live as long as possible. In addition, it deals with love, jealousy, fear, and regret. 

Juila, 18

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